Last edited by Vuk
Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

5 edition of Neurological applications of implanted drug pumps found in the catalog.

Neurological applications of implanted drug pumps

  • 231 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by New York Academy of Sciences in New York, N.Y .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Drug infusion pumps -- Congresses,
  • Neuropharmacology -- Congresses,
  • Nervous system -- Diseases -- Chemotherapy -- Congresses,
  • Drugs -- administration & dosage -- congresses,
  • Infusion Pumps -- congresses,
  • Nervous System Diseases -- drug therapy -- congresses

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by Richard D. Penn.
    SeriesAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences,, v. 531
    ContributionsPenn, Richard D., New York Academy of Sciences.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQ11 .N5 vol. 531, RC350.D78 .N5 vol. 531
    The Physical Object
    Pagination215 p. :
    Number of Pages215
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2041233M
    ISBN 100897664582, 0897664590
    LC Control Number88017873

    The FDA maintains several publicly accessible databases that may be of particular interest to sponsors and manufacturers of neurological devices.   The test pump was implanted in the lower left abdominal areas of porcine cadavers in various orientations. Wire-reinforced catheters were tunneled for 20 – 25 cm under the abdominal epidermis, anteriorly toward the head, and the non-connector pump ends were secured by sutures.

    Introduction. The history of the development of the implantable insulin pump spans decades. Very early in this process scientists realized that delivery of insulin to the peritoneal cavity, rather than intravenous delivery, was the optimal route but their attempts to build a device to achieve this were plagued by the lack of the technological capabilities required to do so. This volume is the second in a new series of pro­ The task carried out through the collaboration of ceedings covering the official scientific meetings of the neurosurgeons and specialists in neurorehabilitation Neurorehabilitation Committee of the World Federa­ cannot be viewed simply as a restoration of function or tion of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS).

    The major applications of microelectronic medical technology are in cardiac implants such as pacemakers and defibrillators, neurostimulators, spinal fusion stimulators, implantable drug pumps, hearing implants, eye implants and others. In , U.S. Food and Drug Administration Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program announced regarding various product recalls owing to malfunctioning of implantable drug infusion pumps which delivered drug overdose leading to risks in patient safety, these factors have abstained the patients from the adoption of implantable drug.


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Neurological applications of implanted drug pumps Download PDF EPUB FB2

Neurological applications of implanted drug pumps. New York, N.Y.: New York Academy of Sciences, (OCoLC) Material Type: Conference publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Richard D.

Author(s): Penn,Richard D; New York Academy of Sciences. Title(s): Neurological applications of implanted drug pumps/ edited by Richard D. Penn. Country of. Ann N Y Acad Sci. ; Neurological applications of implanted drug pumps.

[No authors listed] PMID: [Indexed for MEDLINE]. Recent technological advances have made it possible to deliver drugs directly to the central nervous system via implanted pumps.

This method is currently utilized when other medical or surgical therapies have failed, or have been associated with the production of significant side effects (Smith et al.

Penn RD. Neurological applications of implanted drug pumps. Ann N Y Acad Sci ;– Google ScholarAuthor: J. Brouwers. This article reviews the role of implantable pumps in the treatment of CNS tumors. Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents has been associated with various problems, including adverse systemic effects and decreased concentration of the drug at the target site.

Continuous infusion of chemotherapeutic agents with implantble pumps have been used in an attempt to overcome these. Neurological Oral & Maxillofacial Spinal & Orthopaedic Stroke Care Urological SynchroMed™ II Clinician Programmer Programming Application for Chronic Pain Management.

implantable pump delivers drug to the intrathecal space via an implanted catheter. Recommendations and info about the risks of using medications delivered into the spinal fluid to treat or manage pain that are not approved for implanted pumps.

Implantable infusion pumps are devices that are surgically implanted under the skin, typically in the abdominal region.

They are connected to an implanted catheter and are used to deliver. The peristaltic action of the SynchroMed™ II pump moves the drug from the pump reservoir, through the pump tubing, check valve, catheter port, and implanted catheter, to the infusion site.

The catheter access port (CAP) allows injection of the drug directly into the implanted catheter for drug administration and diagnostic purposes.

Recent technological advances have made possible the delivery of drugs directly into cerebrospinal fluid via implantable pumps. This method is currently utilized when other medical or surgical therapies have failed or have been associated with significant side effects (Smith et al.

).Patients with cancer have been studied most frequently, although this technique is often used in patients. Richard B. Patt, Samuel J. Hassenbusch III, in Pain Management, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Other Therapeutic Devices. Despite early controversy about the safety of MRI in patients with implanted drug delivery systems, most authorities now agree that because the only portions of the SynchroMed pump that are ferrous are the rotors, MRI can be performed safely.

Implantable pumps offer an alternative to tethered systems, injection ports, and frequent animal handling. However, there are no commercially available implantable pumps suitable for periodic infusion of a drug in small animals (rodents) with control of dosage. As of this writing, neurological applications of central drug infusion include clinical studies in patients with chronic pain (10,16, 21, 28, 32, 37, 56, 57, 62, 64), spasticity (17, 48, 53), malignant brain tumors (29), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (49), and Alzhei.

Implantable Electronic Medical Devices provides a thorough review of the application of implantable devices, illustrating the techniques currently being used together with overviews of the latest commercially available medical devices.

This book provides an overview of the design of medical devices and is a reference on existing medical devices. If you and your physician decide targeted drug delivery is right for you, the pump will be implanted during a surgical procedure. This procedure is most often performed in a hospital or outpatient surgery center.

The SynchroMed™ II pump is available in two sizes — 20 ml and 40 ml — to meet your size preference and refill schedule. The book shows you how to take advantage of the performance benefits of microfluidics and serves as your instant reference for state-of-the-art microfluidics technology and applications.

The wide range of applications discussed include fluid control devices, gas and fluid measurement devices, medical testing equipment, and implantable drug s: 1. PUMP REFILLS. Keeping all of your refill appointments will ensure your pump does not run out of medication.

If you miss a refill appointment, it may result in: Loss of, or change in, your therapy; Underdose (too little of the drug) that could lead to a return. Home Healthcare Professionals Therapies & Procedures Neurological Targeted Drug Delivery Indications, Safety, and Warnings.

Toggle navigation. underdose or overdose symptoms. Strong sources of electromagnetic interference (EMI) can negatively interact with the pump and cause heating of the implanted pump, system damage, or changes in pump. Intrathecal Drug Delivery Device Infection A major complication of Intrathecal Drug Delivery Device (IDDD) implantationis infection.

Morgalla et al., assessed IDD-related complications in 51 patients who had IDD systems implanted for the treatment of chronic pain or spasticity. Twelve patients (%) presented a total of 22 complications.

The main type of complication was catheter-related (. INTRODUCTION. Initially used in the treatment of cancer pain 1, the implantation of morphine pumps has become an increasingly used treatment for patients with nonmalignant t intrathecal drug delivery devices have been implanted since their inception in the s benefits of intrathecal drug therapy for the treatment of nonmalignant pain, most frequently due to.Successful drug delivery using implantable pumps may be found in o published articles.

Their versatility in delivering continuous infusion, intermittent or complex infusion protocols acutely or chronically has made them ubiquitous in drug discovery and basic research. Regardless, drug pumps like Jonsson's may hold the promise of future biomedical devices designed to assuage nerve pain and treat neurological diseases.